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Chinese Olympics Spokesman Lashes out at Foreign Media བོད་སྐད། 


China's Olympic spokesman has lashed out at the foreign media, accusing them of being biased in coverage of China and the remote Himalayan region of Tibet.

The sharp rebuke came during a news conference in Beijing Friday, after foreign reporters asked whether the International Olympic Committee was right to award China the Olympics, given its human rights record. Olympic spokesman Wang Wei angrily responded that such questions show how little reporters understand China, and how biased their reporting is.

China claims it is fulfilling its promises on issues such as human rights and freedom of the press during the Olympics. But activists and human rights groups argue that its actions tell a different story.

Earlier this week, Chinese authorities detained six foreigners who were said to be taking part in a wave of pro-Tibet protests during the Olympics.

Chinese police also have roughed up and detained foreign media, despite promises of non-interference during the Games.

The Associated Press says several disgruntled Hong Kong business owners were detained after holding a protest in central Beijing Thursday.

AP also says two of its photographers were roughed up by plainclothes security officers, who briefly detained them and seized their cameras' memory cards.

The organization Students for a Free Tibet says that in the last three weeks, China has detained and deported 49 activists for participating in pro-Tibet demonstrations. And while China designated three parks for approved protests during the Olympics, not one of 77 requests for protests was approved.

In some cases, those who have applied to protest and followed the directions of authorities have been detained or harassed.

A relative of two elderly Chinese women who applied to protest in one of China's three official Olympic protest zones says the women have been ordered to spend a year in a labor camp.

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