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Ahmadinejad says Iran Willing to Negotiate Common Concerns


Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad says his country is willing to negotiate about "common concerns" and to clear up "misunderstandings in the international arena."

However, Mr. Ahmadinejad said in a speech broadcast on state television that Iran will not give up its right to advanced technology. He did not specifically say whether Iran would accept or reject an international package aimed at getting Iran to suspend uranium enrichment.

Wednesday, the United States said Iran must suspend uranium enrichment if it accepts an international package of incentives and returns to multilateral nuclear talks. British Prime Minister Tony Blair said today that last week's U.S. offer to take part in those talks is a big step that shows Washington wants to find a diplomatic solution to nuclear issue.

A State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said the suspension is a "firm condition" of the incentives package offered by the United States, Britain, France, Russia, China the five permanent U.N. Security Council members and Germany.

The U.S. spokesman refused to specify whether Iran will be allowed to enrich uranium in the future. News reports have quoted diplomats as saying the incentives package leaves open such a possibility.

The U.S.-backed incentives package reportedly includes international support for Tehran's effort to build a power plant running on nuclear energy. The United States would agree to drop some trade sanctions and allow Iran to buy spare parts for its aging fleet of American-made aircraft.

The United States and Europe are concerned that Iran has a secret nuclear weapons program. Tehran denies seeking such weapons.
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