Monday 2014/12/22

Tibet

China appoints new Tibet governor, hardline policies to remain

Chinese military personnel carrying fire extinguisher walks in front of Jokhang temple at Barkor Square in Lhasa, TibetChinese military personnel carrying fire extinguisher walks in front of Jokhang temple at Barkor Square in Lhasa, Tibet
x
Chinese military personnel carrying fire extinguisher walks in front of Jokhang temple at Barkor Square in Lhasa, Tibet
Chinese military personnel carrying fire extinguisher walks in front of Jokhang temple at Barkor Square in Lhasa, Tibet

(Reuters) - China appointed a new governor for remote and restive Tibet on Tuesday, naming a hardline ethnic Tibetan in a signal that the government has no plans to ease up on its tight control on the Himalayan region.

Losang Gyaltsen, 55, was elected at the end of the annual meeting of Tibet's largely rubber stamp regional assembly, and replaces previous governor Padma Choling, according to an announcement by the official Xinhua news agency.

Losang Gyaltsen is a former mayor of Tibetan capital Lhasa and once taught Marxist theory, according to his official biography. His name is also spelled Losang Jamcan in English.

He reports to Tibet's top official, Communist Party chief Chen Quanguo, a position which traditionally has always been held by a Han Chinese rather than an ethnic Tibetan.

"He's rather hardline, but all officials at that level are the same," said prominent Tibetan writer Woeser. "There will be no real change in Tibet."

China has defended its iron-fisted rule in Tibet, saying the mountainous region suffered from dire poverty, brutal exploitation and economic stagnation until 1950, when Communist troops "peacefully liberated" it.

A post in Tibet is one of the most challenging positions for Communist Party officials, but can also be a route to higher office if they are judged to have performed well.

President Hu Jintao served as party boss in Tibet from 1988-1992, while rising star Hu Chunhua, recently appointed party chief in booming Guangdong province and seen as a possible future president, has some two decades of Tibet experience.

Speaking to Tibet's legislature on Tuesday, the new governor, Losang Gyaltsen, said the government would "resolutely struggle" against exiled Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama, who China accuses of promoting violent separatism, charges he denies.

"We will unswervingly protect the unity of the motherland and ethnic harmony ... and maintain harmony and stability in Tibet," the China News Service quoted him as saying.

"Harmony and stability are the basic guarantee of Tibet's development and prosperity," he added.

China has tightened already strict controls in Tibet since an upsurge in self-immolations by Tibetans protesting Chinese rule over the past two years, though most of the burnings have happened in heavily Tibetan areas outside of what China calls the Tibet Autonomous Region.

Almost 100 Tibetans have set themselves alight since the protests began in 2009, most of whom have died.

Despite expectations for improvement, the crackdown inside Tibet could become even worse once Chinese Communist Party boss Xi Jinping becomes president in March as he seeks to cement his rule, said an overseas Tibetan rights advocate.

"I wouldn't be surprised if at the beginning of his tenure things might get worse before they get better, because he will want to stamp his authority early on," said Kate Saunders of the International Campaign for Tibet.

Xi's late father, Xi Zhongxun, a liberal-minded former vice premier, had a close bond with the Dalai Lama before the monk fled into exile in 1959 following a failed uprising against Chinese rule.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani)
This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

LATEST NEWS

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Headline News Dec 19, 2014i
X
19.12.2014
བོད་རྒྱའི་གྲོས་མོལ་གྱི་འགལ་རྐྱེན། མཆོད་འབུལ་སྨོན་ལམ། ཨ་རི་དང་ཀུ་པ། ཨུ་རུ་སུའི་དངུལ་ལོར་གྱི་ཛ་ཐང་། དྲྭ་འབྲེལ་གྱི་འཇིགས་སྐུལ། ཨབ་གྷ་ཎི་སི་ཏཱན། རྒྱ་གར་གྱི་གྲོས་ཚོཊ་འཐུས་མིའི་བོད་དོན་རྒྱབ་སྐྱོར་ཚོཊ་པ་སླར་གསོ། སྤྱི་འཐུས་ཀྱི་ཚོགས་ཆུང་ཞིག་ཐེ་ལན་ལ་ཕྱོགས་ཕེབས། སྤྱི་འཐུས་ཀྱི་ཚོགས་ཆུང་ཞིག་ཐེ་ལན་ལ་ཕྱོགས་ཕེབས། རྒྱ་གར་གྱི་མཁའ་དབྱིངས་ལས་གྲྭ རྒྱལ་ས་ལྷ་སར་དགའ་ལྡན་ལྔ་མཆོད།

KUNLENG DISCUSSION

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Sangay Khar’s Self-Immolation on December 15, 2014i
X
19.12.2014
Kunleng discusses the release of Hata after 19 years of imprisonment and the state of affairs in Inner Mongolia for cultural freedom and human rights
Video

Video Sangay Khar’s Self-Immolation on December 15, 2014

Kunleng discusses the release of Hata after 19 years of imprisonment and the state of affairs in Inner Mongolia for cultural freedom and human rights
Video

Video Release of Mongolian prisoner Hata and the state of affairs in Inner (South) Mongolia

Kunleng discusses the release of Hata after 19 years of imprisonment and the state of affairs in Inner Mongolia for cultural freedom and human rights
Video

Video Mugey Samten: The Legacy Of A Cultural Hero

Kunleng discusses the life of an extraordinary Tibetan who was educated in the monastic system of pre-invasion Tibet, and became one of the few remaining scholars responsible for the revival of Tibetan language and culture after the wholesale destruction of the ‘cultural revolution.’ Tibetan intellectuals organized a centennial birth memorial for Mugey Samgten last month in Southwest Nationality University in Chengdu.
Video

Video The Life And Work Of Gen Tashi Tsering

The life of the recently deceased political maverick, educator, and dictionary author, who returned to Tibet from exile in 1963 against all prevailing wisdom. Starting as a dance troupe member for the Ganden Phodrang government, Tsering came into exile and then returned to China from the US. After years of deprivation during ‘cultural revolution’, he went on to become a respected educator in Lhasa, establishing over 30 private schools.
Video

Video Chidue Dhardon Sharling On Her Work

Kunleng invites Ms. Dhardon Sharling, current member of the Exile Tibetan Parliament, to discuss the lobbying efforts in India by Tibetan parliamentarians, and her work on empowering exile Tibetan women.
More

CYBER TIBET

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Cyber Tibet Dec 12, 2014i
X
12.12.2014
Cyber Tibet introduces VOA Tibetan’s QR Code project, looks at Chinese netizen comments and cartoons on China’s Internet minister’s meeting with the Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, the debate over educator Tashi Tsering who died recently, speaks with Jetsun Cheme, a popular healthcare supporter who does fund raising through Wechat, and plays the popular song Youku by Golok Gyaltsen.
Video

Video Cyber Tibet Dec 12, 2014

Cyber Tibet introduces VOA Tibetan’s QR Code project, looks at Chinese netizen comments and cartoons on China’s Internet minister’s meeting with the Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, the debate over educator Tashi Tsering who died recently, speaks with Jetsun Cheme, a popular healthcare supporter who does fund raising through Wechat, and plays the popular song Youku by Golok Gyaltsen.
Video

Video Cyber Tibet Nov 28, 2014

Cyber Tibet looks at Tibetan netizens expressing frustration over seeing a picture of China’s mining project at a holy mountain in Amchok, collection of pictures from schools in Tibet that have mandated Chupa as their official uniform, introduces the radio app of Voice of Tibet, online Tibetan book store www.tbdanz.com speaks with translator and writer Chung Tsering, and concludes with a video dance clip by Tibetans in the 1950s.

Contact Us