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Ellen Bork of FPI Calls for New Approach to Tibet


Protesters take part in a solidarity march from the Chinese Consulate to the United Nations (UN) Headquarters in support of Tibet in New York, December 10, 2012. The march also aims to brings to attention a string of self-immolations that have taken place

Protesters take part in a solidarity march from the Chinese Consulate to the United Nations (UN) Headquarters in support of Tibet in New York, December 10, 2012. The march also aims to brings to attention a string of self-immolations that have taken place


Ellen Bork, democracy and human rights director at Foreign Policy Initiative called on the United States to rethink its policies on Tibet in a Wall Street Journal op-ed. Urging a new approach to address the “never ending cycle of repression,” Ellen asks “[w]hat if Tibet's claim to independence had been preserved rather than conceded?”

The Tuesday op-ed postulated a need for "new thinking to address the escalating suffering in Tibet" and a better understanding of the west's acquiscene in China's claim of rule in Tibet.

“It is time for a review of these policies and their effectiveness as well as new thinking to address the escalating suffering in Tibet,” Ellen wrote.

Ellen suggested that the U.S., its European allies, Japan and India back the Dalai Lama's access to international leaders and endorse his future reincarnation plans, and "establish regular contacts" to work with the Tibetan administration in Dharamsala to "engage with Beijing on solutions for the future."

"Understanding how the world acquiesced in communist China's subjugation of Tibet and the ineffective policies that flowed from that decision should enable the U.S. and other democracies to recover the principle American diplomats expressed in the 1950s, the right of Tibetans to determine the future of their homeland," said Ellen.

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